Monday, August 26, 2019


Are cell phones as safe as regulators and manufacturers say they are? Could the levels of radiofrequency radiation be higher than reported and thus pose a potential danger to humans; especially to children and pregnant women?

The Chicago Tribune just published their findings of an investigation they did where they tested 11 popular smart phone models ( using a FCC accredited lab) and what they found is disturbing

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Fluoride Exposure During Pregnancy Linked to Lowered Baby IQ


Fluoride. It helps prevent tooth decay and cavities. In fact, it can be so effective in oral health that the US started adding fluoride to public drinking water in the 1940s. Toothpastes contain fluoride and dentists insist on its importance in fighting cavities for children and adults alike.

However, for some time now, there has been talk (and research) showing that fluoride is a potential neurotoxin. Additionally, some animal research, has found potential side effects, including bone cancer in addition to cognitive impairment.

Because of the recent controversy over the safety of fluoride, in the last 20 years about 300 communities in the US have ended fluoridation programs in municipal drink water sources, but 66% of Americans still have fluoride in their drinking water.

While our federal agencies still insist it is safe, levels of fluoride in our drinking water have been decreased in recent years. A couple of years ago the US government agreed that the levels of fluoride added to drinking water were no longer considered safe and thus lowered them from 1 ppm to 0.7 ppm. Now, the question remains if .7ppm is still too high.


NEW STUDY

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Consumer Reports Article: How to Eat Less Plastic



I spoke about this must read  from Consumer Reports today online and so I thought I would include a link here for you to find it and read it.  Among the highlights:

"But what many people don't know is that we're doing more than just using plastic. We're ingesting it, too. When you eat a bite of food or even have a sip of water, you're almost certainly taking in tiny plastic particles along with it. These ubiquitous fragments are known as microplastics.


Because research into microplastics is so new, there’s not yet enough data to say exactly how they’re affecting human health, says Jodi Flaws, Ph.D., a professor of comparative biosciences and associate director of the Interdisciplinary Environmental Toxicology Program at the University of Illinois.
But “there cannot be no effect,” says Pete Myers, Ph.D., founder and chief scientist of the nonprofit Environmental Health Sciences and an adjunct professor of chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University"
"These chemicals have been linked to a variety of health problems, including reproductive harm and obesity, plus issues like organ problems and developmental delays in children."

6 Tips to Reduce your Exposure to plastic: